Beaches of the East Coast

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The East Coast of Bar­ba­dos faces the beau­ti­ful Atlantic Ocean. This coast is known to fea­ture huge rugged stone for­ma­tions with panoramic views of the sea, mak­ing it per­fect for sight­see­ing. Swim­ming is not usu­ally rec­om­mended along the East Coast because of the rough nature of the Atlantic Ocean. How­ever there are a few beaches and coves that swim­mers may enjoy. Con­versely the rough waters of this coast are truly an entic­ing lure for local & inter­na­tional surf lovers. Spots such as Bath, Soup Bowl and Bathsheba are very pop­u­lar for theis­s­port. The East Coast is a gem of stun­ning land­scapes, cool breezes, rus­tic views and wicked waves.



Foul Bay– St. Philip
This beau­ti­ful beach is located on the south-​east of the island. It offers stun­ning views of the Atlantic coast, with its white sandy shores. The sea con­di­tions here can get pretty rough, with a strong under­tow. As such this beach is not rec­om­mended for swim­mers. How­ever, strong swim­mers should be able to enjoy here. This bay also attracts a few surfers. It is a beau­ti­ful beach for a picnic.

Waves– Medium to Large

Ameni­ties
Shower/​Toilets
Parking
Pic­nic Tables
No Life­guard


Crane Beach– St. Philip
This south-​east beach fea­tures lovely white sand, with a stun­ning cliff view. On top of the cliff is the famed lux­ury accom­mo­da­tion– The Crane Hotel Resort & Res­i­dences. Here these Atlantic waters are rea­son­ably safe for swim­mers, with per­sons gen­er­ally stick­ing to near the shore­line. This beach is a favourite among many locals, who tend to fre­quent the beach more around the week­end. This beach also enjoys a steady stream of tourist traf­fic. Facil­i­ties and beach rentals are avail­able at The Crane Hotel. This beach is not wheel­chair accessible.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore
Amenities
Park­ing


Gin­ger Beach– St. Philip
Another south-​east coast beach, Gin­ger Beach is a mag­nif­i­cent, tran­quil beach. The white sand is beau­ti­fully soft with sub­tle pink hues. This secluded beach is a per­fect pic­nic set­ting, or even just for an early morn­ing stroll. This beach is also a sun-​tanners delight offer­ing a glit­ter­ing view of the Atlantic Ocean, and its won­der­fully cool breeze is a mag­i­cal lull.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Ameni­ties
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Lifeguard


Beachy Head Bay– St. Philip
This secluded south­east beach is a neat, cozy bay area with star­tling views of the Atlantic Ocean and the rugged coastal ter­rain. The sands are white with pink hues, and the sea is a beau­ti­ful turquoise colour, reflect­ing the bril­liance of the sky. Coconut trees nes­tled in the seascape makes this a very pic­turesque spot.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Amenities
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard


Shark’s Hole Bay– St. Philip
Don’t worry! There are no sharks in Shark’s Hole Bay. Actu­ally, quite in con­trast, it is a tran­quil and very small cove that requires a bit of climb­ing down. It favours a nat­ural pool and is enclosed by low-​lying cliffs. It fea­tures beau­ti­fully calm, blue waters, and the famed white-​pink sands of the East Coast.

Waves– Very calm and tran­quil close to shore­line, with medium to large waves beyond enclo­sure. Ideal for swim­ming close to shore

Long Bay– St. Philip
As its name sug­gests, Long Bay is a long stretch of beach that is actu­ally made up of three bays sep­a­rated by sea cliffs. Here, two of the bays actu­ally front Sam Lord’s Cas­tle, a his­toric build­ing belong­ing to a noto­ri­ous pirate. These two bays became later known as Sam Lord’s Beach.

This secluded beach is not wheel­chair acces­si­ble, as patrons have to walk down a steep set of stairs to enter this watery paradise.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Amenities
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard


Har­ri­smith Beach/​Cave Bay– St. Philip
This beau­ti­ful, quiet beach has a pic­turesque view of the Atlantic Ocean adorned with the shady beauty of coconut trees. It is also the site of a ruin of an old 20th cen­tury plan­ta­tion man­sion called the Har­ri­smith Great House. There are also a num­ber of hid­den caves scat­tered about this area.

Waves- Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore


Bot­tom Bay– St. Philip
This south­east secluded beach is a nat­ural gem of white, sandy beaches, cool breezes and nat­u­rally sparkling blue Atlantic waters. It is a beau­ti­ful loca­tion for a roman­tic evening, or even a fam­ily pic­nic. The beau­ti­ful land­scape com­ple­mented by coconut trees and sea-​grape shrubs makes this loca­tion a nature lover’s par­adise.
Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Ameni­ties
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard


Pal­metto Bay– St. Philip
This beau­ti­ful bay high­lights the beauty of the Atlantic Ocean against the lush back­drop of coconut trees and the won­der­fully green land­scape. It has stun­ning views of a cliff and enchant­ing rock for­ma­tions. Its sands are a golden colour, with a pink cast. It is a secluded beach, mak­ing it per­fect for a roman­tic get-​a-​way.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Ameni­ties
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard

Ragged Point/​East Point– St. Philip
This coastal delight can be found right by the his­toric Ragged Point Light­house. This beach offers breath­tak­ing views of the Atlantic Ocean, and of Bar­ba­dos’ east and north coast. Just off the coast here, you can also see the for­ma­tion of Culpep­per Island, the only remain­ing island belong­ing to Bar­ba­dos. There is a small, sandy beach sur­rounded by coastal rock for­ma­tions, with golden coloured sand. This is cer­tainly a must see for nature and beach lovers.

Waves– Large to extremely large waves. Not rec­om­mended for swim­ming


Skeete’s Bay-​St. Philip
This beau­ti­ful, rus­tic bay is also the home of a small fish­ing com­mu­nity. Here you can buy fresh fish when avail­able, and meet some of the island’s fisher folk. This bay is dec­o­rated with quaint fish­ing ves­sels– a won­der­ful pho­to­graphic oppor­tu­nity. You can also spot Culpep­per Island to the south east of this bay. Great beach for fishing.

Waves- Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore as bay can be calm

Amenities
Shower/​Toilet
Parking
No Life­guard

Con­sett Bay– St. John
This east coast bay is also home to a small fish­ing com­mu­nity, and fea­tures a long jetty. Many boats usu­ally dock around this area, and you can some­times buy fresh fish here. The waters are not usu­ally calm and can be a bit rough, so strong swim­mers should approach with care and due cau­tion. There are lovely rock for­ma­tions about the beau­ti­ful landscape.

Waves- Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Amenities
Shower/​Toilet
No Lifeguard

Bath Beach– St. John
This beau­ti­ful, golden sand beach is indeed a trea­sure found on the east coast. Its waters are more suit­able for swim­ming, unlike many of the other beaches fac­ing the Atlantic Ocean. This is due to the reef that is found here which breaks up the rough waters of the Atlantic Ocean, allow­ing a smoother tran­si­tion to the shore­lines. It is a great place to pic­nic, and offers gra­cious views of the ocean and its sur­round­ing land­scape. There is even a small water­fall and spring, which courses its way into the sea. It is also a place of his­tor­i­cal value, as it fea­tures rem­nants of the old train line which ran from Bridgetown to Bathsheba dur­ing 18811937. Along the coast of bath beach you will also find sev­eral guest houses.

Waves– Medium waves. Calm in some areas. Suit­able for swimming

Amenities
Shower/​Toilet
Parking
Beach Bar (Food & Drinks)
Children’s Playpark
Wheel­chair accessible
Trees pro­vide shade
Rangers
Benches
Pic­nic Tables
Life­guard on duty


Martin’s Bay– St. John
This pic­turesque beach fea­tures stun­ning rock for­ma­tions, lush land and seascape, turquoise-​coloured waters and golden sands. This beach is also largely used for fish­ing in Bar­ba­dos, and you may be able to secure some fresh fish, includ­ing lob­sters here. Its waters can be rough, so cau­tion must be exer­cised in the event of swim­ming. Here also fea­tures shal­low reef, with the waters being con­sid­er­ably rougher beyond the reef.

Waves– Medium to Large. Pos­si­ble to swim close to shore

Amenities
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard


Tent Bay– St. Joseph
This beau­ti­ful, rus­tic bay is also home to a small fish­ing vil­lage, and was once part of the train sys­tem that ran from St. Andrew to Bridgetown in the 1800s. It also has a beach­front prop­erty, the Atlantis Hotel, another 19th cen­tury Bar­ba­dos build­ing. This coast offers pic­turesque views of the Atlantic Ocean, with the cool, invig­o­rat­ing breeze that only the east coast can give. The for­ma­tion of a few nat­ural pools here makes Tent Bay suit­able for swimmers.

Waves– Large Waves. Pos­si­ble to swim close to the shore due to the for­ma­tion of nat­ural pools.

Ameni­ties
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
No Lifeguard

Bathsheba– St. Joseph
This stun­ning beach cer­tainly is one of the prized gems of the East Coast. Here one can see the Atlantic Ocean in her unin­ter­rupted splen­dour, amidst breath­tak­ing back­drops of remark­able stone for­ma­tions, beau­ti­ful lush land­scape, and pris­tine sandy waters. Here, the cur­rents are very strong, mak­ing this beach a favourite for surfers in Bar­ba­dos. Surfers are known to fre­quent what is known as ‘Soup Bowl’ in Bathsheba, and host year round activ­i­ties there. Bathsheba cer­tainly has no lack of activ­ity and beauty.

Here the sand is won­der­fully golden, and a care­ful search could unearth beau­ti­ful sea shells. It is cer­tainly one of the most ruggedly beau­ti­ful beaches Bar­ba­dos has to offer, and is one of the most pop­u­lar. This is also a very good beach for pic­nics. Be sure to walk with your camera!

While not suit­able for swim­mers, the for­ma­tion of quite a few nat­ural pools make it pos­si­ble for sea lovers to still get wet. Bathsheba is also of his­tor­i­cal value to Bar­ba­dos as it is the site of an old train line, which was oper­a­tional in the 1800s.

Waves– Large to very large waves. An ideal place for expe­ri­enced surfers. Nat­ural pools are also formed here.

Ameni­ties
Shower/​Toilets
Food and Drinks available
Benches
Children’s Park
Parking
Rangers
Benches
Pic­nic Tables
Trees pro­vide shade
No Life­guard


Cat­tle­wash– St. Joseph
This east coast beach, aptly named after locals used this beach to wash their cat­tle to rid them of par­a­sites, is one of the longest beaches on the island. At sev­eral miles long, this rus­tic beach reveals many nat­ural pools in low tide within its reef, mak­ing it safe to swim in this event. This beach also has an abun­dance of sea-​grape shrubs, a plant that pro­duces deli­cious pur­ple grape-​like fruit found in abun­dance along Bar­ba­dos’ east coast. This beach is also a great spot for pic­nick­ers. Cat­tle­wash is found in the area known to locals as East Coast Road.

Waves– Large to very large waves. An ideal place for expe­ri­enced surfers. Nat­ural pools are also formed here in low time are ideal for light swimming.

Ameni­ties
Parking
Trees pro­vide shade
Life­guard on duty


Bar­clays Park– St. Joseph
This east coast beach is quite a pop­u­lar spot among locals and vis­i­tors for pic­nics and other out­ings. This long beach offers stun­ning views of the Atlantic Ocean, along with windswept sea-​grape shrubs to com­ple­ment this breath­tak­ing view. This park was donated to the Bar­ba­dos Gov­ern­ment by Bar­clays Bank to com­mem­o­rate Bar­ba­dos’ Inde­pen­dence, and was offi­cially opened by Queen Eliz­a­beth II in 1966.

Waves– Gen­er­ally rough sea con­di­tions with large to very large waves. Nat­ural pools formed around this beach can be ideal for swimmers.

Ameni­ties
Shower/​Toilets
Parking
Benches
Pic­nic Tables
Trees pro­vide shade

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