Nat­ural Attractions

Bar­ba­dos is an island filled with beau­ti­ful nat­ural won­ders, from lush veg­e­ta­tion to under­ground streams and caves to be found through­out the island. When tra­vers­ing the island, you can expect to be delighted by the sights, scenes and the rich col­ors of the islands flora and fauna. The rain­bow of color may and have you search­ing for that pot of gold on your merry adven­ture. Speak­ing of adven­ture, there is no com­par­ing a hike through our beau­ti­ful coun­try­side, a great oppor­tu­nity to take in all the nat­ural beauty and his­tory the island has to offer. Free hikes on island occur reg­u­larly brought to you by the Bar­ba­dos National Trust.



If you stopped to ask any Bajan about the most pop­u­lar nat­ural attrac­tion they would invari­ably say Har­risons Cave, St. Thomas, filled with beau­ti­ful water­falls and pools the sparkle like dia­monds in the light. They might then direct you to Androm­eda Gar­dens, a won­drous botan­i­cal gar­den, hid­den away in the St. Joseph coun­try­side on a site that over­looks the islands pic­turesque East Coast. It is a site well worth the drive for Nature lovers.

Harrissons Cave, St Thomas  Barbados Welchman Hall Gully

Bar­ba­dos truly is a geo­log­i­cal island gem. There are many great loca­tions across the island that offers spec­tac­u­lar views of Bar­ba­dos’€™ beau­ti­ful trop­i­cal envi­ron­ment. Bar­ba­dos cer­tainly has no lack of nat­ural beauty.

Arti­cle © Caribbean Dreams Mag­a­zine
Photo #1 orig­i­nally from cari​wave​.com
Photo #2 orig­i­nally from vis​it​bar​ba​dos​.co


Queen’s Park

Located in the cap­i­tal city of Bridgetown, this national park was once the home of the Com­man­der of the British Troops which used to be sta­tioned in Bar­ba­dos. The most strik­ing nat­ural fea­ture of Queen’€™s Park is its two baobab trees. Brought to Bar­ba­dos in 1738 from Guinea, Africa, these trees are among the few which remain on the island, with one being approx­i­mately 18 meters in cir­cum­fer­ence, mak­ing it one of the largest trees in Barbados.

Far­ley Hill

This national park is located at a cool 900ft above sea level and sits on approx­i­mately 17 acres of lush land. It is a pic­turesque tree-​filled spot which is a mecca for pic­nick­ers. There is also the pre­served remains of the Far­ley Hill Man­sion against its back­drop. Its height above sea level makes it a very cool place to relax, even on hot days.

Tel: (246) 4223555

Bar­ba­dos Wildlife Reserve

Bar­ba­dos has its very own wildlife reserve, and it’€™s just the place to see ani­mals up close in their nat­ural habi­tat. From the shy hare, to the mis­chie­vous mon­keys and the slith­ery snakes (caged!), you will be in for a treat in this reserve.

There is even a walk-​through aviary where one can see an array of birds, includ­ing col­or­ful par­rots and flamin­gos. Another inter­est­ing tid­bit is that all build­ings in the Wildlife Reserve were con­structed from coral rock which had been exca­vated from nearby gul­lies. This is cer­tainly a slice of par­adise for nature lovers. READ MORE

Folke­stone Marine Park and Vis­i­tor Centre

Folke­stone Marine Reserve is a marine pro­tected area which falls under the ambit of the National Con­ser­va­tion Com­mis­sion. Its most strik­ing fea­ture is the arti­fi­cial reef cre­ated by the delib­er­ate sink­ing of the ship Stavronikita. This reef is located less than half a mile from the shore and is 120ft deep. There is also an inshore reef found in the Recre­ational Zone of the Reserve. The area is mostly utilised by snorkel­ers and scuba divers. Inside the Vis­i­tors Cen­tre is a small museum which has beau­ti­ful pho­tographs and inter­est­ing infor­ma­tion on coastal marine life on dis­play. There is also an aquar­ium which is home to lots of inter­est­ing sea crea­tures and life forms.

To facil­i­tate the dif­fer­ent activ­i­ties around the coral reefs, Folke­stone is divided into four zones:

  • The Sci­en­tific Zone
  • North­ern Water Sports Zone
  • Recre­ational Zone
  • South­ern Water Sports Zone

Tel: (246) 4222314


Arti­cle © Caribbean Dreams Mag­a­zine
Photo #1 © Caribbean Dreams Magazine


Androm­eda Botanic Gardens

Tucked away on a cliff in the Parish of St. Joseph are six acres of the great­est col­lec­tion of trop­i­cal and exotic plants on the island. Here you will encounter a wide vari­ety of exotic blooms, palms, ferns and cacti; and more than six hun­dred species of plants which have adapted to a trop­i­cal envi­ron­ment. This breath­tak­ing scenery is fur­ther enhanced by a stream that runs though the prop­erty form­ing serene water­falls and pools. Tel: (246) 4339454

Andromeda



Flower For­est

Founded in 1985, this botan­i­cal gar­den is 53.6 acres of trop­i­cal par­adise. Located on the grounds of Rich­mond Plan­ta­tion in St. Joseph, the Flower For­est has been beau­ti­fully land­scaped, and is filled with many exotic and native blooms. Amidst a breath­tak­ing coun­try­side back­drop, the Flower For­est is one of the most visu­ally sat­is­fy­ing nature gems on the island. There are over 100 species of trop­i­cal flora found here. There is also a Best of Bar­ba­dos Gift Shop and a snack bar for light refreshments.

Tel: (246) 4338152

Orchid World

Orchid World is a six acre exquis­itely land­scaped orchid gar­den tucked away among the cane fields of Sweet Bot­tom and Groves Plantations.

orchid world

They have the largest and most exten­sive orchid col­lec­tion in the Caribbean. This exotic gar­den has four orchid houses, a fern­ery, and two court­yards with sev­eral Van­da­ceous orchids. As you walk through this per­fumed gar­den, you will be cap­ti­vated by Van­das, Calan­thes, Cat­tlyeas and Den­dro­bi­ums. There are over 30,000 orchids in this beau­ti­ful gar­den, in addi­tion to many other trop­i­cal plants such as the bougainvil­lea, heli­co­nia and fern.

Tel: (246) 4330306



Arti­cle © Caribbean Dreams Mag­a­zine
Photo #1 © Caribbean Dreams Mag­a­zine
Photo #2 orig­i­nally from flickr​.com



Welch­man Hall Gully

This venue is per­fect for nature lovers! Welch­man Hall Gully is rich in his­tory and has a vast and inter­est­ing assort­ment of Bar­ba­dian and exotic plants and wildlife.This is also a great loca­tion to spot some of the island’s infa­mous Green Monkeys.

Welchman hall1600x1200 5333910671 eaf6c3698d

Among the flora and fauna found in this Gully you can find the Phyl­lan­thus ander­sonii, or gully shrub– one of the few remain­ing indige­nous plants in Barbados.

Tel: (246) 4386671

Jack-​In-​The-​Box

Admis­sion to this foliage-​rich gully is free. It is a lush jun­gle, filled with majes­tic trees and hun­dreds of dif­fer­ent plant species. As gul­lies are the home of Bar­ba­dos’€™ Green Mon­key, you may even see a few while explor­ing this nat­ural won­der. Ariel Trip Zip Lines offer an over­head trip across the gully.

Harrison’s Cave

This stun­ning nat­ural for­ma­tion is located in the mid­dle of Bar­ba­dos. It is a crys­tal­lized lime­stone cav­ern, unique to the trop­i­cal world. This mys­te­ri­ous under­ground cave is replete with amaz­ing and awe-​inspiring sta­lag­mites, sta­lac­tites and columns, along with curi­ous water­falls and sparkling under­ground pools.

Harrissons cave picture 4

The cool moisture-​rich air and the gen­tle sounds of the water only help to enhance this mys­ti­cal expe­ri­ence. Tour guides are very knowl­edge­able, and you are sure to be trans­formed while in this under­ground king­dom. A visit to Harrison’€™s Cave is guar­an­teed to be an unfor­get­table experience.

Tel: (246) 4173700
READ MORE

Cole’s Cave

This beau­ti­ful under­ground cave is per­fect for explor­ers who like a mildly chal­leng­ing trek. Here in this dark under­world, you can wit­ness stun­ning Cave for­ma­tions, and refresh­ing pools of water. With a descent into this cave by rope, you will be up close and per­sonal in this tran­quil envi­ron­ment. There is no veg­e­ta­tion, due to the absence of sun­light, and the only other forms of life spot­ted here are cray­fish, a few insects, and bats. This is cer­tainly a great cave adven­ture. Be sure to con­tact your tour oper­a­tors for any avail­able guided tours. It is not rec­om­mended to explore this cave with­out pro­fes­sional supervision.

Ani­mal Flower Cave

This beau­ti­ful sea cave is located under the cliffs at North Point, St. Lucy. The cave’s coral floor is esti­mated to be 400000 to 500000 years old and the ‘younger’ coral sec­tion above the floor is about 126000 years old. But this is not the main fea­ture of this cave. Ani­mal Flower Cave is home to sea anemones, or €‘ani­mal flowers’€™.

animal flower cave

The flower con­sists of ten­ta­cles that can sting and par­a­lyze a pass­ing fish in the larger vari­ety of species. The ten­ta­cles retract into the stalk or stump for safety on con­tact with an alien object like a stick. The flower then waits a while before com­ing out of the stalk again to allow dan­ger to pass. Tel: (246) 4398797


There have been two little-​known unin­hab­ited islands just off the coast and belong­ing to Bar­ba­dos. Today there remains only one of these small islands– Culpep­per Island.

Pel­i­can Island

Pel­i­can Island, aptly named after the Brown Pel­i­cans who used this small island as a nest­ing ground, was once off the west coast of Bridgetown and Fontabelle in St. Michael. It was said that dur­ing low tide it was pos­si­ble to wade over to the island, and in the event of high tide, jet­ties were taken. A quar­an­tine facil­ity was housed on this island specif­i­cally for sick crew and pas­sen­gers from ships, so as to con­tain com­mu­ni­ca­ble /​infec­tious dis­eases and pre­vent them from spread­ing to the main­land. Between 1956 and 1961, the Caribbean Sea between Pel­i­can Island and Bar­ba­dos was reclaimed and filled in dur­ing the time of the con­struc­tion of the Bar­ba­dos Port. Pel­i­can Vil­lage, a tourist attrac­tion by the Port fea­tur­ing unique Bar­ba­dian arts and craft, was named as a trib­ute to this lost island.

Culpep­per Island

The remain­ing island, Culpep­per, is located a lit­tle over 250 ft off Bar­ba­dos on the east­ern coastline.

It is in the Atlantic Ocean, and it is pos­si­ble to wade over to this island in low tide. Swim­mers are cau­tioned to be care­ful as the cur­rent here can be very strong. Named after the Culpep­per fam­ily who once owned this piece of land in the 18th cen­tury, this lit­tle island is also very close to another tourist attrac­tion and her­itage spot– Ragged Point Light­house. There is also a claim by mem­bers of the region’s indige­nous Lokono-​Arawak and Karifuna-​Carib tribes in March 2006 stat­ing that Culpep­per Island belongs to them. They were descen­dants of Princess Mar­ian, daugh­ter of the last Hered­i­tary Lokono Arawak Chief Amoro­ta­he­Haubariria (Fly­ing Harpy Eagle) of the Eagle Clan, and the Karifuna-​Carib ambas­sadors from the island of Dominica. Culpep­per Island is 220 ft x 75 ft and rises approx­i­mately 20 ft out of the water.



WILDLIFE RESERVE GRAEME HALL SWAMP
BAR­CLAYS PARK HUNTE’S GAR­DENS
BLACK­MANS GULLY PETREA GAR­DENS
CHANCERY LANE SWAMP THREE HOUSES PARK
ERROL BAR­ROW PARK TURN­ERS HALL WOODS

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